What Actually Happened on October 7th?

Sunday, October 29, 2023 9:28 PM

The mind is like a parachute. It works only when it is open.—Frank Zappa


Dear Friends + Interlocutors,

It seems possible, indeed likely, that the scope of the Hamas' October 7th attack has been exaggerated and distorted. The armed incursion outside the walled perimeter of Gaza came as a shock to Israel and a surprise to everyone.

But was it Islamic terrorism in the mode of al-Qa'ida and ISIS? Or was it a military raid by a band of guerrilla fighters?  

In the aftermath, the President of Turkey has said that Hamas is not a terrorist organization and has denounced the sanctimony of Washington, London, Berlin, and Paris. Is President Erdogan a terrorist?

I submit two items to consider:




In the meantime, I stumbled across a note I wrote in 2006, which pointed out an article in the Christian Science Monitor about Lebanon and Israel. You could substitute “Gaza” for “Lebanon” in the current outbreak. Nothing has changed in 17 years.

Nothing has changed because that is the plan, the deliberate aim of Israel’s strategic policy which has been dutifully carried out by Washington. Tel Aviv initiates the policy. The U.S. has had no independent foreign policy when it comes to the Palestinians. It follows the dictates of Israel.

Patrick
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Self-defense or Nonsense?

Thursday, August 3, 2006 12:15 AM

Right is right and wrong is wrong, to coin a phrase. See below in the Christian Science Monitor one of the most provocative and persuasive articles I have ever encountered on the subject of the Middle East conflict. It is the unspoken, unwritten truth which everybody is vaguely aware of, stuck in the back of their minds.

The enabling crux of the problem is that Gentile politicians in Washington, D.C., from the White House on down, cannot speak up against the ongoing injustice of Israel, because they fear being branded "anti-Semitic". By default, therefore, it seems to me that it is up to American "liberal" Jewry to step up to the task and break with militant Zionism. This may be an unrealistic hope, but it is the only possibility for a just peace, for any peace. The Gentiles are too craven and/or ignorant to act.  

Inasmuch as the "Israel Lobby' maintains an absolute hammer-lock on U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, until and unless American Jews come to their senses and recognize the error of their ways, politicians in Washington will not be persuaded that enough is enough. U.S. Presidents and American representatives on Capitol Hill will live in fear of their political careers being terminated.

Aspirants to the Presidency and to the Congress will vigorously promote the status quo in order to get elected.  A catastrophic, irrational and unnecessary blood feud will continue with high-tech weapons well into the 21st century, with the likely spread of terrorism to Europe, America and beyond.

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Hizbullah's attacks stem from 
Israeli incursions into Lebanon

By Anders Strindberg || The Christian Science Monitor || August 1st, 2006

NEW YORK -- As pundits and policymakers scramble to explain events in Lebanon, their conclusions are virtually unanimous: Hizbullah created this crisis. Israel is defending itself. The underlying problem is Arab extremism. Sadly, this is pure analytical nonsense. Hizbullah's capture of two Israeli soldiers on July 12 was a direct result of Israel's silent but unrelenting aggression against Lebanon, which in turn is part of a six-decades long Arab-Israeli conflict.

Since its withdrawal of occupation forces from southern Lebanon in May 2000, Israel has violated the United Nations-monitored "blue line" on an almost daily basis, according to UN reports. Hizbullah's military doctrine, articulated in the early 1990s, states that it will fire Katyusha rockets into Israel only in response to Israeli attacks on Lebanese civilians or Hizbullah's leadership; this indeed has been the pattern.

In the process of its violations, Israel has terrorized the general population, destroyed private property, and killed numerous civilians. This past February, for instance, 15-year-old shepherd Yusuf Rahil was killed by unprovoked Israeli cross-border fire as he tended his flock in southern Lebanon. 

Israel has assassinated its enemies in the streets of Lebanese cities and continues to occupy Lebanon's Shebaa Farms area, while refusing to hand over the maps of mine fields that continue to kill and cripple civilians in southern Lebanon more than six years after the war supposedly ended. What peace did Hizbullah shatter?

Hizbullah's capture of the soldiers took place in the context of this ongoing conflict, which in turn is fundamentally shaped by realities in the Palestinian territories. To the vexation of Israel and its allies, Hizbullah - easily the most popular political movement in the Middle East - unflinchingly stands with the Palestinians.

Since June 25, when Palestinian fighters captured one Israeli soldier and demanded a prisoner exchange, Israel has killed more than 140 Palestinians. Like the Lebanese situation, that flare-up was detached from its wider context and was said to be "manufactured" by the enemies of Israel; more nonsense proffered in order to distract from the apparently unthinkable reality that it is the manner in which Israel was created, and the ideological premises that have sustained it for almost 60 years, that are the core of the entire Arab-Israeli conflict.

Once the Arabs had rejected the UN's right to give away their land and to force them to pay the price for European pogroms and the Holocaust, the creation of Israel in 1948 was made possible only by ethnic cleansing and annexation. This is historical fact and has been documented by Israeli historians, such as Benny Morris. Yet Israel continues to contend that it had nothing to do with the Palestinian exodus, and consequently has no moral duty to offer redress.

For six decades the Palestinian refugees have been refused their right to return home because they are of the wrong race. "Israel must remain a Jewish state," is an almost sacral mantra across the Western political spectrum. It means, in practice, that Israel is accorded the right to be an ethnocracy at the expense of the refugees and their descendants, now close to 5 million.

Is it not understandable that Israel's ethnic preoccupation profoundly offends not only Palestinians, but many of their Arab brethren? Yet rather than demanding that Israel acknowledge its foundational wrongs as a first step toward equality and coexistence, the Western world blithely insists that each and all must recognize Israel's right to exist at the Palestinians' expense.

Western discourse seems unable to accommodate a serious, as opposed to cosmetic concern for Palestinians' rights and liberties: The Palestinians are the Indians who refuse to live on the reservation; the Negroes who refuse to sit in the back of the bus.

By what moral right does anyone tell them to be realistic and get over themselves? That it is too much of a hassle to right the wrongs committed against them? That the front of the bus must remain ethnically pure? When they refuse to recognize their occupier and embrace their racial inferiority, when desperation and frustration causes them to turn to violence, and when neighbors and allies come to their aid - some for reasons of power politics, others out of idealism - we are astonished that they are all such fanatics and extremists.

The fundamental obstacle to understanding the Arab-Israeli conflict is that we have given up on asking what is right and wrong, instead asking what is "practical" and "realistic." Yet reality is that Israel is a profoundly racist state, the existence of which is buttressed by a seemingly endless succession of punitive measures, assassinations, and wars against its victims and their allies.

A realistic understanding of the conflict, therefore, is one that recognizes that the crux is not in this or that incident or policy, but in Israel's foundational and persistent refusal to recognize the humanity of its Palestinian victims. Neither Hizbullah nor Hamas are driven by a desire to "wipe out Jews," as is so often claimed, but by a fundamental sense of injustice that they will not allow to be forgotten.

These groups will continue to enjoy popular legitimacy because they fulfill the need for someone - anyone - to stand up for Arab rights. Israel cannot destroy this need by bombing power grids or rocket ramps. If Israel, like its former political ally South Africa, has the capacity to come to terms with principles of democracy and human rights and accept egalitarian multiracial coexistence within a single state for Jews and Arabs, then the foundation for resentment and resistance will have been removed. If Israel cannot bring itself to do so, then it will continue to be the vortex of regional violence.

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 Anders Strindberg, formerly a visiting professor at Damascus University, Syria, is a consultant on Middle East politics working with European government and law-enforcement agencies. He has also covered Syria, Lebanon, and the Palestinian territories as a journalist since the late 1990s, primarily for European publications.